BCV: The Honeymoon is Over

Posted on Posted in BCV: Alaska 2014


I believe a marriage can have multiple honeymoon phases, regardless of the length of the marriage. The actuality of this long, anticipated trip served to reignite those “just married” emotions for us. However, after three months on the road, I believe the honeymoon is over due to the following scenario:


We were driving to Antonito, Colorado when we saw the Great Sand Dunes National Park sign. Our atlas stated that it is the youngest National Park in the U.S., decreed by Congress in 2004 and that the dunes in this park are the tallest in North America.  It was only 25 miles off our intended path, so we detoured to it.

We found the dunes truly spectacular and other worldly.  We could see tiny dots of people way up on the dunes.  Although we were not prepared for a hike, I could not leave the park without at least attempting to summit the 1.25 mile hike to the High Dune on the First Ridge. So we grabbed our hats and water bottles and headed up.


But then Jim literally left me…the altitude, elevation and uphill climb in deep sand were challenging and I couldn’t keep up with his long strides. When I called out for him to wait, he told me that he was also struggling and was in “survival mode”. Interpretation: every person for him or herself! What happened to “we are in this together”, chivalry and gentility? So having no choice, I continued to struggle up hill alone, sinking into the sand. I decided perhaps I didn’t sound pitiful enough and called out to him again, this time with a distressing tone. His response was “you’ll make it” as he continued ahead of me.


I finally began walking in his footsteps, which reserved my energy because it was difficult pulling my feet out of the sand as I sank. At least the sand was already compressed if I followed the path he made. I laughed out loud and snapped the picture below when I caught Jim doubled over, gasping for air. You see, by this time, I was able to conserve my energy because he was using his energy to create my path!


Jim was considerate enough to carry both water bottles in his shorts pockets since I had no pockets and he would allow me to catch up with him from time to time in order to get a drink of water. But, don’t be deceived. When he reached the penultimate peak, he stood there, looked down at me struggling up the most difficult climb (by this time, the wind was so strong, his footprints were covered with sand so I no longer had his path to follow) and held up my water bottle, he claims as a motivator for me. Perhaps I wouldn’t doubt his sincerity if it weren’t for such a wicked grin on his face.   DSC_0157

Both of us succeeded in reaching the summit of High Dune, a total elevation gain of 699 feet, although Jim arrived well before I did. In spite of the high wind and exhaustion, I had to strike my victory pose. Descending was easier for me than Jim so I sought my revenge and left him in a sprint when we reached flat ground again. I guess the honeymoon is over for me too!





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