MX2: Rear Bumper Kitchen

Posted on Posted in MX2: 2001 Ford Ranger

I decided to create a shelf that folds down from the rear bumper. Since I’ll be cooking outside, this extra space will come in handy. First I pickup some hinges and stainless steel cable.

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Then I measure the area needed for the shelf and cut a piece of sheet steel.

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I notch the ends and bend all the edges 90 degrees.

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Next I mock-up where the hinges should go for weight distribution then drill holes.

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The corners get welded and cleaned up.

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Small reinforcing strips are welded across the bottom side inline with the hinges.

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After cooling I bolt the hinges in pace, square the shelf up on the bumper then weld the other portion of the hinge in place.

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To hold the shelf in a level position I use the stainless steel cable. A small bolt is welded on the upper tubing on the swing gate. Another bolt is added at the shelf’s far corners.

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For securing the shelf when stored away I pickup some small cam latches.

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I need a pace for the latches to grab on to, so I weld on a small piece of steel above the shelf.

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Another little piece is welded vertical giving the latch an edge to grab on to.

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Two of these are created then the latch body is screwed into place.

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Once completed, I take the shelf apart to be sand blasted.

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After cleaning a quick paint job is applied.

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The steel cable connections are backed with two washers and two nuts. This allows the cable to move a little when opening the closing the shelf.

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Strips of foam are added where the shelf will hit. This is to stop any rattling.

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Once the paint is dry everything gets reassembled.

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Now I have a nice wrap around cook area and work space.

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To further support the swing gate I build an upper hinge. Starting with a scrap piece of the same diameter inner tubing, I insert it into the top of the hinge.

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Next I mark the right side tail gait latch holes and length onto a piece of strap steel.

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I then drill the holes, cut to length, clean up the edges and install.

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An angle is cut onto the remaining strap steel and tack welded between the hinge and bolt plate.

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Now I trim off the excess strap steel and full weld up.

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After the upper hinge is reinstalled I add an angled brace.

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Both sides are fully welded.

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To finish off the top I weld on a domed cap.

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A few minutes with the grinder cleans the rough edges, then I sand blast clean.

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Then I give it a quick paint then install.

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Adding the additional shelf space led me to create a special mount for my stove. First I mockup the position of the stove at the swing gate’s rear.

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I use more of the smaller diameter tubing that slides into the end of the lower support. The tube is bent to the back of the stove.

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Next I cut some square tubing that will slide into the stove.

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The square tubing and a cap get welded on.

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After creating the support arm I start on a mount. A larger diameter square tube is used inside the stove to keep the stove from rocking side to side.

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A 4 inch by 4 inch plate is welded onto the tubing.

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Everything is slid into place.

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Do keep the whole stove arm from flopping around the end of the swing gate is notched a quarter inch.

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The reverse notch is cut on a larger diameter tube and welded on the stove support arm.

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Refitting everything I drill holes and place the mount and cut a hole in the rear of the stove.

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As a test I pace a pot full of water on the stove.

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